It’s as true in today’s Hollywood as it was 70 years ago: There’s nothing as sexy as… Lauren Bacall.
Not just because of how she slinked through her debut film, 1944’s “To Have and Have Not,” with a voice that sounded like whiskey neat and the most come-hither directions ever put on film (“You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and blow”). Nor because of her long hair that seemed to shine even in the darkened corners of noir drama.
It was all that, yes, but it was also a word associated with men: swagger. Bacall had it in spades, and woe to the poor fathead or fall guy who considered her just another dame.New York Daily News

It’s as true in today’s Hollywood as it was 70 years ago: There’s nothing as sexy as… Lauren Bacall.

Not just because of how she slinked through her debut film, 1944’s “To Have and Have Not,” with a voice that sounded like whiskey neat and the most come-hither directions ever put on film (“You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and blow”). Nor because of her long hair that seemed to shine even in the darkened corners of noir drama.

It was all that, yes, but it was also a word associated with men: swagger. Bacall had it in spades, and woe to the poor fathead or fall guy who considered her just another dame.
New York Daily News

barbarastanwyck:

Norma Shearer applying her makeup on the set of Strangers May Kiss, 1931

barbarastanwyck:

Norma Shearer applying her makeup on the set of Strangers May Kiss, 1931

movielandscans:

Ava Gardner, Modern Screen, November 1953

movielandscans:

Ava Gardner, Modern Screen, November 1953

errolflynns:

Betty Grable and Lauren Bacall refer to their real-life husbands in “How to Marry a Millionaire”, 1953

saisonciel:

Melva Cornell by Witzel, c. 1930

saisonciel:

Melva Cornell by Witzel, c. 1930

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